St. Nicholas - Stanford-On-Avon

Built from the local ironstone the present 14th century parish church of St. Nicholas was rebuilt from an earlier Norman church.

Piscina south aisle - Stanford-on-avon Effigy south aisle - Stanford-on-avon Memorial south aisle - Stanford-on-avon

This church is full of treasures. Starting with the South walll of the south aisle there is a C14 piscina, an effigy of a C14 priest on a low tomb chest, and a 1640 wall memorial.

Medieval stained glass panels - Stanford-on-Avon South aisle east window - Stanford-on-Avon Medieval stained glass panels - Stanford-on-Avon

Detail medieval stained glass panels - Stanford-on-Avon Detail medieval stained glass panels - Stanford-on-Avon Detail medieval stained glass panels - Stanford-on-Avon

The south aisle windows contain remnant of medieval stained glass dating back to 1330.

Monument to Sarah Baroness Braye Monument to Sarah Baroness Braye Monument to Sarah Baroness Braye

The west wall of the south aisle is taken up by a large marble monument by Mary Thorneycroft in memory of Sarah Baroness Braye (d1862), a memorial window to her, by Hardman & Co., can be found in the South Kilworth church of St. Nicholas.

Detail medieval stained glass panels - Stanford-on-Avon Font - Stanford-on-Avon Detail medieval stained glass panels - Stanford-on-Avon

The window in the bell tower contains fragments of medieval glass. The font is C14 with a carved tracery pattern.

Monument - Stanford-on-Avon Monument - Stanford-on-Avon Monument - Stanford-on-Avon

The north aisle like the south aisle has a number of monuments. On the west wall is a large marble monument by Richard Westmacott Jr to Robert Otway Cave (d1844) and Sophia Otway Cave (d1849). The north wall has a monument of a lancer by Felix Joubert (1896) dedicated to Edmund Verney (d1879).

Alabaster memorial - Stanford-on-Avon Alabaster memorial - Stanford-on-Avon

labaster memorial - Stanford-on-Avon Alabaster memorial - Stanford-on-Avon Alabaster memorial - Stanford-on-Avon

Next to the stataue of a lancer is a late Elizanbethan alabaster tomb in memorial to Henry Knollys and his wife Margaret Cave (c1600).

Medieval stained glass panels Medieval stained glass panels - Stanford-on-Avon

The east window of the north aisle contains glass dated to about 1330-1340 with depictions of the Resurection, Angels, Crucifixion, Virgin, and St John.

Alabaster memorial - Stanford-on-Avon Alabaster memorial - Stanford-on-Avon Alabaster memorial - Stanford-on-Avon

Between the north aisle and the nave, is an early Elizabethan alabster monument to Thomas Cave (c1558) and his wife.

Elizabethan alabaster chest tomb with putti and roundel - Stanford-on-Avon Elizabethan alabaster chest tomb with children - Stanford-on-Avon

At the head end of the tomb chest two putti hold a roundel, at the foot end are representations of his 14 children.

Nave - Stanford-on-Avon Organ - Stanford-on-Avon Stanford-on-Avon

The upper parts of the chancel screen come from Lutterworth, the organ case in the west gallery is C16/C17 and is reputed to come from the Royal Chapel Whitehall.

Stained glass - Stanford-on-Avon Stained glass - Stanford-on-Avon

Stained glass - Stanford-on-Avon Stained glass - Stanford-on-Avon

More medieval stained glass is contained in the east window, and north and south chancel windows.

Monument - Stanford-on-Avon Alabaster memorial - Stanford-on-Avon

The chancel has another memorial by Richard Westmacott Jr this time to Thomas Otway Cave (d1830). In addition there is an alabaster memorial to Richard Cave (d1606 Padua) which stands next to the memorial to his parents.

Alabaster memorial - Stanford-on-Avon Alabaster memorial - Stanford-on-Avon

Alabaster memorial - Stanford-on-Avon Alabaster memorial - Stanford-on-Avon

At the east end of the North wall stand a large alabaster memorial to Sir Thomas Cave (d1613) and his wife. The base of which contains reliefs of their children.

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This entry was posted on Saturday, December 6th, 2008 at 7:36 pm and is filed under Daventry District, Northamptonshire. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Responses are currently closed, but you can trackback from your own site.